#Trans: an anthology about transgender and nonbinary identity online
Contributing Author 
by Evelyn DeshaneAllen HopeSkylar KergilHarlow FigaShane McGrieverDaisy CainsErika PriceS. BhattaraiVelvl RyderKim Kaletsky.
About the book: "#Trans is an essay collection featuring the works of twenty transgender and nonbinary writers as they share their experiences with online communities, video games, and dating apps--among other technologies. Each author's experience of their identity breaks away from the typical transgender narrative that is predominantly hung up on surgery and medical intervention. While that aspect is still a part of the story for some of these writers, surgery has never been the sole inspiration which pushes these writers forward. Whether it was the love of a particular movie, the desire to share a feeling on social media, or a song they couldn't get out of their heads, these twenty writers' experiences of their identity have been shaped by media, technology, and the internet." 
Author of "YouTube Auto-Ethnography: an Introduction of Sorts," pages 11-17.
Tied for 1st place in the 2017 Rainbow Awards - LGBT Memoir/Biography
2nd place in the 2017 Rainbow Awards - Best Overall Transgender Work
Available through amazon: http://amzn.to/2njlqbl
Finding Identity Within Online Community:
A Cyberethnography of FTM YouTubers
Undergraduate thesis in Anthropology; High Honors from Haverford College.
Abstract:
This thesis examines FtM (female to male) transgender people on YouTube, their relationships with Internet platforms, with each other, with their bodies, and with mass media. Exploring content uploaded by trans YouTubers, as well as interviews with three YouTubers (Liam Rutz, Chase Ross and Charles Thomy), this thesis examines how the unprecedented modes of sharing and viewing the body through digital self-representation supports individuals exploring trans identities. Topics of online self-representation/archival, online queer vernacular, online accessibility to community, queer narratives, and the gendered body in cyberspace are discussed based on cyberethnographic observations and literature. Findings suggest that self-representational digital media is a strong force of affirmation and education for trans and cis people alike, regardless of their geographical and cultural environments.
 
Multimedia / interactive website version of text is here.